6 Gorgeous Video Games That Were Way Ahead Of Their Time


Technology in video games has come a long way. In early 1990s video game character was just used to be made out of pixels and that was considered as “Amazing” at their time of release. Fast Forward to 2017 we can see the pores in characters skin and every strand of their hairs. It is crazy to see how far we have come in terms of video game technology. Today we are counting down some of the most technologically advanced video games ever made and those games that were ahead of their time.

DUNE II: THE BUILDING OF A DYNASTY

Reception

Computer Gaming World stated that the PC version of Dune II “easily outshines its predecessor in terms of game play … a real gem”, with “arguably the most outstanding sound and graphics ever to appear in a strategy game of its kind”.Electronic Games gave the game a 92% score.

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GamePro dubbed the Genesis version “one of the best war strategy carts for the Genesis”, praising the controls, digitized speech, music, and fun gameplay. Electronic Gaming Monthly scored the Genesis version an 8 out of 10, commenting that the gameplay is not only addictive but easy to learn, which they stated is highly unusual for a strategy game.

SYSTEM SHOCK 2

Reception

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System Shock 2 received over a dozen awards, including seven “Game of the Year” prizes.Reviews were very positive and lauded the title for its hybrid gameplay, moody sound design, and engaging story. System Shock 2 is regarded by critics as highly influential, particularly on first-person shooters and the horror genre. In a retrospective article, GameSpot declared the title “well ahead of its time” and stated that it “upped the ante in dramatic and mechanical terms” by creating a horrific gameplay experience.Despite critical acclaim, the title did not perform well commercially only 58,671 copies were sold by April 2000.

ULTIMA UNDERWORLD

Reception

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Ultima Underworld was not an immediate commercial success, which caused Origin to decrease its marketing support. However, its popularity increased via word of mouth during the years after its release, and sales eventually reached nearly 500,000 copies. The game received critical acclaim, with praise directed toward its 3D presentation and automapping feature. In 1993 the game won the Origins Award for Best Fantasy or Science Fiction Computer Game of 1992, and was nominated for an award at the Game Developers Conference.

 

SHENMUE

Reception

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Shenmue received mostly positive reviews, with an average aggregate score of 89.34% on GameRankingsMany reviews praised the game’s graphics, realism, soundtrack and ambition. IGN called Shenmue “a gaming experience that no one, casual to hardcore gamer, can miss”. Eurogamer called it “one of the most compelling and unusual gaming experiences ever created.” GameSpot wrote that though Shenmue is “far from perfect” it was “revolutionary” and “worth experiencing – provided you have the time to invest.”

STARFLIGHT

Reception

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Critical response to Starflight upon its release was extremely positive. Hartley and Patricia Lesser complimented the game in their “The Role of Computers” column in the December 1986 issue of Dragon, calling it “stunning in its presentation and play”. In 1986 and 1987, Computer Gaming World declared it “the best space exploration game in years” and “the best science fiction game available on computer”.The magazine named Starflight its Adventure Game of the Year for 1987 and in August 1988, it joined the magazine’s Hall of Fame for games highly rated over time by readers, with the third-highest rating for action/adventure games on the list, and the fourth-highest overall.

VIRTUA FIGHTER

Reception

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Virtua Fighter is often considered to be the grandfather of 3D fighting games, with each iteration being noted for advancing the graphical and technical aspects of games in the genre. Many 3D fighting game series such as Tekken and Dead or Alive were influenced by Virtua Fighter, and the original Dead or Alive ran on the Model 2 hardware. In 1998, the series was recognized by the Smithsonian Institution for contributions in the field of Art and Entertainment and became a part of the Smithsonian Institution’s Permanent Research Collection on Information Technology Innovation. It’s arcade cabinets are kept at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, where Virtua Fighter is the only video game on permanent display

Source – Wikipedia

#6 Gorgeous Video Games That Were Way Ahead Of Their Time

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